Queer Kids On Bikes

Ainu woman, northern Japan.  About 1920’s

Ainu woman, northern Japan.  About 1920’s

dduane:

girljanitor:

bashi-bazouk:


peppercyanide:


sisterwolf:



via



I never even
c
wow
How did they get away with that
AH
I LOVE THIS


What do you mean how did they get away with it?
History isn’t one straight line progressing towards a liberal society.
Look how much Americans attitudes have changed between 1980 and today. 1980 was the first time most very religious people voted, they abstained before that at the behest of their churches. Now they dictate policy at every election.
In my family photo album there are pictures from the 20s of a woman called ‘uncle bob’. She dressed in men’s clothing, and had a ‘companion’. This was a rough industrial town, they were working class, nobody cared. It was her business.
This is why politics is important - the moment you think everything is better today than it was in the past, you let other people take control of the direction society goes in - with you sitting back presuming we’re going forwards.


reblogging for the commentary

There’s not enough love in the world. The sooner people stop stomping on it because it’s arrived in a shape they don’t recognize, the better.

dduane:

girljanitor:

bashi-bazouk:

peppercyanide:

sisterwolf:

via

I never even

c

wow

How did they get away with that

AH

I LOVE THIS

What do you mean how did they get away with it?

History isn’t one straight line progressing towards a liberal society.

Look how much Americans attitudes have changed between 1980 and today. 1980 was the first time most very religious people voted, they abstained before that at the behest of their churches. Now they dictate policy at every election.

In my family photo album there are pictures from the 20s of a woman called ‘uncle bob’. She dressed in men’s clothing, and had a ‘companion’. This was a rough industrial town, they were working class, nobody cared. It was her business.

This is why politics is important - the moment you think everything is better today than it was in the past, you let other people take control of the direction society goes in - with you sitting back presuming we’re going forwards.

reblogging for the commentary

There’s not enough love in the world. The sooner people stop stomping on it because it’s arrived in a shape they don’t recognize, the better.

Francesca Woodman (1958 – 1981) was an American photographer best known for her black and white photography, which mainly featured herself. Her work continues to be the subject of much attention, years after she committed suicide at the age of 22.

fromthefloatingworld:

tsmskimonoyokubo:

Hello everyone! I received a question last night from fishstickmonkey:
About post #34537232835 which you reblogged from From The Floating World, geisha or courtesan? And how does one tell?
That’s a good question and often times it’s very hard for most people to tell them apart. I will be using three key factors in separating a Courtesan from a Geisha, and i will also define a Maiko as well. I will not go into an great depth as to their professions and why they are different there, but essentially Courtesans (Tayuu and Oiran are the highest ranks and appear in the photos) are extremely accomplished and talented, well courtesans! These were not your common street walkers. These ladies were almost like prized exotic birds, not only judged on their beauty, skill or talent but also on their temperament and personality. many Courtesans are revered and some even compared to Goddesses in Japanese prints. Yes, they did have sex for money. Geisha and Maiko (apprentice geisha) are strictly entertainment of a none nude fashion. I could talk all day about their differences but the bottom line is Maiko and Geisha do NOT have sex for money. As per my usual posts, please excuse my shitty spelling and typing. <3
The three most distinguishing features of the three are: Hair (ornaments and style), Kimono & obi and finally foot wear.
The Courtesan (Tayuu/Oiran)
A Japanese courtesan has a very very distinguished look. The clearest identifying quality right off the bat is the HAIR. She has many many different combs and kanzashi and the over all style is far larger and more flamboyant. I will be posting diagrams of the many many more common Courtesan styles in another post. Her kimono and obi are worn in a very distinct manner as well. You will always see her obi tied in the front. A Tayuu with a obi tied in the shape of a bow tie is actually still in her apprenticeship  She also typically wears an Uchikake over her kimono (here are some post examples of Uchikake i have done in the past: http://tsmskimonoyokubo.tumblr.com/search/uchikake). Lastly her shoes! A Courtesan’s geta are MASSIVELY tall. So tall in fact, that when they walk they need and attendant to help them and have to walk in a very particular fashion. 
The Geisha:
As you can see from the black and white photos, taken around the same time period as the b&w photos of the courtesans, she is much more subdued. Her hair is not as ornate, her kimono is not as billowing and heavily brocaded, the sleeves are short and her obi is tied in the back. The obi is also normally tied in a small drum shape called taiko musubi. The geisha wear Geta or Zori depending on the occasion  but in no way are as large as that of a courtesan.
The Maiko:
Maiko are apprentice Geisha. Their look is also very different from the Courtesan’s. Long flowing sleeves on her furisode and her obi tied in the back indicate that is not only a younger lady but also that she is an apprentice geisha and not a Shinzo (apprentice courtesan) or a Kamuro (child attendant for a courtesan, also apprenticing). Her geta are quite unique. While also being quite large they are hollow, and typically have a little bell affixed in the hollow section of the geta so that with every step, they jingle.
Well! Broken down very simply into three main features, you can now tell them apart. it can be difficult in vintage photos to tell a Geisha from a regular lady wearing kimono as Geisha where considered the female fashion trend setters for many many years. I hope this helped fishstickmonkey !!!!! <3  - TSM

Good information for anyone who’s ever wondered the difference!

The girls with the tayuu in the first photograph are called kaumro.  They’re her attendants.  

http://www.meijishowa.com/photography/2309/91204-0003-tayuu-and-kamuro

http://www.immortalgeisha.com/ig_bb/viewtopic.php?t=8009


“Momotaro taking a photo of her friend.
This is my favourite postcard in my collection!
What I particularly love about it aside from the fact they are barefoot in the river, and taking a photo is how they’ve just casually hitched their hikizuri up and tucked it into the top of their obi…and also tied the bottom corners of their hikizuri at the front to stop it from falling down!
These scans are from my own private collection of postcards, real photos and dance programs.”

“Momotaro taking a photo of her friend.

This is my favourite postcard in my collection!

What I particularly love about it aside from the fact they are barefoot in the river, and taking a photo is how they’ve just casually hitched their hikizuri up and tucked it into the top of their obi…and also tied the bottom corners of their hikizuri at the front to stop it from falling down!

These scans are from my own private collection of postcards, real photos and dance programs.”

fromthefloatingworld:

Kabuki – Shunkyō Kagami Jishi 1910s by Blue Ruin1 on Flickr.

A Kabuki dancer as the rampaging spirit of a shishi (mythical lion), who falls asleep after sporting among the peonies, only to be awoken by two kochō (butterflies) that tease him mercilessly as he angrily tries to catch them. He works himself into a mighty rage, flinging his luxuriant mane around in a fury of movement.

fromthefloatingworld:

Kabuki – Shunkyō Kagami Jishi 1910s by Blue Ruin1 on Flickr.

A Kabuki dancer as the rampaging spirit of a shishi (mythical lion), who falls asleep after sporting among the peonies, only to be awoken by two kochō (butterflies) that tease him mercilessly as he angrily tries to catch them. He works himself into a mighty rage, flinging his luxuriant mane around in a fury of movement.

rocknonsense:

By Jean Angélou - Paris, 1920’s.
Beautiful girl. Beautiful pic.

rocknonsense:

By Jean Angélou - Paris, 1920’s.

Beautiful girl. Beautiful pic.


On the Sand by A. Davey on Flickr.

On the Sand by A. Davey on Flickr.